Savage Continent: Europe in the Aftermath of World War II

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St. Martin's Press #ad - In some of the greatest acts of ethnic cleansing the world has ever seen, tens of millions were expelled from their ancestral homelands, often with the implicit blessing of the Allied authorities. Based principally on primary sources from a dozen countries, Savage Continent is a frightening and thrilling chronicle of a world gone mad, the standard history of post WWII Europe for years to come.

Violent anti-semitism was reborn, sparking murders and new pogroms across Europe. Crime rates were soaring, economies collapsing, and the European population was hovering on the brink of starvation. It is fondly remembered as a time when cheering crowds filled the streets, danced, drank and made love until the small hours.

Savage Continent: Europe in the Aftermath of World War II #ad - These images of victory and celebration are so strong in our minds that the period of anarchy and civil war that followed has been forgotten. The institutions that we now take for granted - such as the police, the media, transport, local and national government - were either entirely absent or hopelessly compromised.

Individuals, communities and sometimes whole nations sought vengeance for the wrongs that had been done to them during the war. In savage continent, keith lowe describes a continent still racked by violence, where large sections of the population had yet to accept that the war was over. Savage continent is the story of post wwii europe, in all its ugly detail, from the end of the war right up until the establishment of an uneasy stability across Europe towards the end of the 1940s.

Concentration camps were reopened and filled with new victims who were tortured and starved.

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After the Reich: The Brutal History of the Allied Occupation

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Basic Books #ad - By the end of the year, denied access to any foreign aid, Germany was literally starving to death. An astonishing 2. 5 million ordinary Germans were killed in the post-Reich era. A shocking account of a massive and brutal military occupation, After the Reich draws on an array of contemporary first-person accounts of the period to offer a bold reframing of the history of World War II and its aftermath.

After the Reich: The Brutal History of the Allied Occupation #ad - In the ensuing occupation, hundreds of thousands of women were raped. Hundreds of thousands of Germans and German-speakers died in the course of brutal deportations from Eastern Europe. The shocking history of the brutal occupation of Germany after the Second World WarWhen the Third Reich collapsed in 1945, Germany was a nation in tatters, in many places literally flattened by bombs.

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Crimes and Mercies: The Fate of German Civilians Under Allied Occupation, 1944–1950

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Talonbooks #ad - In 1997. More than 9 million germans died as a result of deliberate Allied starvation and expulsion policies after World War II—one quarter of the country was annexed, and about 15 million people expelled in the largest act of ethnic cleansing the world has ever known. The first english-speaking writer to gain access to the newly opened KGB archives in Moscow and to recently declassified information from the renowned Hoover Institution in California, James Bacque tells the extraordinary story of what happened to these people and why.

Revised and updated for this new edition, bestseller Crimes and Mercies was first published by Little, Brown in the U. K. Never before had such compassion been shown. That these deaths occurred at all is still being denied by Western governments. At the same time, a food-aid program that saved an estimated 800 million lives during three years of global struggle against post–World War II famine—a program they had to struggle for years to make accessible to the German people, Herbert Hoover and Canadian Prime Minister MacKenzie King created the largest charity in history, who had been excluded from it as a matter of official Allied policy.

Crimes and Mercies: The Fate of German Civilians Under Allied Occupation, 1944–1950 #ad - Never before had such revenge been known. Over 2 million of these alone, including countless children, died on the road or in concentration camps in Poland and elsewhere.

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The Vanquished: Why the First World War Failed to End

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Farrar, Straus and Giroux #ad - Winner of the tomlinson book prizea times literary supplement best book of 2016an epic, has always been a solemn date—the end of fighting that had destroyed a generation, November 11, groundbreaking account of the ethnic and state violence that followed the end of World War I—conflicts that would shape the course of the twentieth centuryFor the Western Allies, 1918, but also a vindication of a terrible sacrifice with the total collapse of the principal enemies: the German Empire, Austria-Hungary, and the Ottoman Empire.

. It was here, in the ruins of Europe, that extreme ideologies such as fascism would take shape and ultimately emerge triumphant. As absorbing in its drama as it is unsettling in its analysis, The Vanquished is destined to transform our understanding of not just the First World War but the twentieth century as a whole.

The Vanquished: Why the First World War Failed to End #ad - But for much of the rest of europe this was a day with no meaning, as a continuing, nightmarish series of conflicts engulfed country after country. In the vanquished, a highly original and gripping work of history, Robert Gerwarth asks us to think again about the true legacy of the First World War. In the years immediately after the armistice, millions would die across central, eastern, and southeastern Europe before the Soviet Union and a series of rickety and exhausted small new states would come into being.

In large part it was not the fighting on the western front that proved so ruinous to Europe’s future, as countries on both sides of the original conflict were savaged by revolutions, mass expulsions, pogroms, but the devastating aftermath, and further major military clashes.

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The New Faces of Fascism: Populism and the Far Right

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Verso #ad - These images spontaneously surface in the face of the rise of radical right, islamophobia and terrorism, xenophobia, racism, the last of which is often depicted as a form of "Islamic fascism. Beyond some superficial analogies, however, all these contemporary tendencies reveal many differences from historical fascism, probably greater than their affinities.

Paradoxically, the fear of terrorism nourishes the populist and racist rights, with Marine Le Pen in France or Donald Trump in the US claiming to be the most effective ramparts against "Jihadist fascism". He suggests the concept of post-fascism--a hybrid phenomenon, neither the reproduction of old fascism nor something completely different--to define a set of heterogeneous and transitional movements, suspended between an accomplished past still haunting our memories and an unknown future.

The New Faces of Fascism: Populism and the Far Right #ad - What is fascism in the twenty first century?what does fascism mean at the beginning of the twenty-first century? When we pronounce this word, dictatorships, our memory goes back to the years between the two world wars and envisions a dark landscape of violence, and genocide. But since fascism was a product of imperialism, can we define as fascist a terrorist movement whose main target is Western domination? Disentangling these contradictory threads, Enzo Traverso's historical gaze helps to decipher the enigmas of the present.

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The Japanese Empire: Grand Strategy from the Meiji Restoration to the Pacific War

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Cambridge University Press #ad - Japan won the first sino-japanese war 1894–5 and the russo-japanese war 1904–5 but became overextended in the Second Sino-Japanese War 1931–45, which escalated, with profound consequences, into World War II. This analytical survey examines themes including the development of Japanese institutions, domestic politics, diversity of opinion within the government, Japanese foreign policy and China's anti-Japanese responses.

It is an essential guide for those interested in history, politics and international relations. A combination of incomplete institution building, a skewed balance between civil and military authority, an increasingly lethal international environment, and a misunderstanding of geopolitics explains these divergent outcomes.

The Japanese Empire: Grand Strategy from the Meiji Restoration to the Pacific War #ad - The japanese experience of war from the late-nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century presents a stunning example of the meteoric rise and shattering fall of a great power. As japan modernized and became the one non-European great power, its leaders concluded that an empire on the Asian mainland required the containment of Russia.

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The Fear and the Freedom: How the Second World War Changed Us

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St. Martin's Press #ad - The fear and the freedom is the first book to look at all of the changes brought about because of WWII. Based on research from five continents, keith Lowe’s The Fear and the Freedom tells the very human story of how the war not only transformed our world but also changed the very way we think about ourselves.

It was because of the war that penicillin was first mass-produced, computers were developed, and rockets first sent to the edge of space. Bestselling historian keith lowe's The Fear and the Freedom looks at the astonishing innovations that sprang from WWII and how they changed the world. The fear and the freedom is Keith Lowe’s follow-up to Savage Continent.

The Fear and the Freedom: How the Second World War Changed Us #ad - All of these things and more came about as direct consequences of the war and continue to affect the world that we live in today. The war created new philosophies, new ways of living, new architecture: this was the era of Le Corbusier, Simone de Beauvoir and Chairman Mao. It killed millions and eradicated empires, creating the idea of human rights, and giving birth to the UN.

. But amidst the waves of revolution and idealism there were also fears of globalization, a dread of the atom bomb, and an unexpressed longing for a past forever gone. While that book painted a picture of europe in all its horror as wwII was ending, The Fear and the Freedom looks at all that has happened since, focusing on the changes that were brought about because of WWII—simultaneously one of the most catastrophic and most innovative events in history.

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Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945

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Penguin Books #ad - Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945 #ad -  . Both intellectually ambitious and compelling to read, thrilling in its scope and delightful in its small details, Postwar is a rare joy. Finalist for the pulitzer prizewinner of the council on foreign relations arthur Ross Book AwardOne of the New York Times' Ten Best Books of the YearAlmost a decade in the making, this much-anticipated grand history of postwar Europe from one of the world's most esteemed historians and intellectuals is a singular achievement.

Postwar is the first modern history that covers all of Europe, both east and west, drawing on research in six languages to sweep readers through thirty-four nations and sixty years of political and cultural change-all in one integrated, enthralling narrative.

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A Woman in Berlin: Eight Weeks in the Conquered City: A Diary

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Picador #ad - Spare and unpredictable, a woman in berlin tells of the complex relationship between civilians and an occupying army and the shameful indignities to which women in a conquered city are always subject--the mass rape suffered by all, minutely observed and utterly free of self-pity" The Plain Dealer, Cleveland, regardless of age or infirmity.

A woman in berlin stands as "one of the essential books for understanding war and life" A. S. With bald honesty and brutal lyricism" elle, the anonymous author depicts her fellow Berliners in all their humanity, as well as their cravenness, corrupted first by hunger and then by the Russians. Byatt, author of Possession.

A Woman in Berlin: Eight Weeks in the Conquered City: A Diary #ad - A new york times book review editors' choicefor eight weeks in 1945, as Berlin fell to the Russian army, a young woman kept a daily record of life in her apartment building and among its residents.

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